It was the time of summers when I got my menstruation cycle for the first time. I still remember that day, I was crying and was full of do1702Illusubts that what exactly happened to me. I came home all worried and crying, asked my mum to talk to me in personal. She immediately left everything and came in my room. The first thing I told my mum was. I am bleeding, and I don’t know why. Mum smiled and said she knew some changes were happening to my body.

She acted normal and explained me the whole process. I was still ashamed as I was the first one in my class to get it (aaaand I dint know about it). I never told my classmates about it. But one small talk to mum changed the whole prospective about it. The summers in Gurgaon are very cruel so we used to sleep in the balcony. As I was sleeping in the night and new to these changes to my body. I was carefree and was sleeping in the ease. The next morning I woke and saw there were stains all over my PJs and rushed to washroom to take a bath and get ready for the school.

I thought nobody knew about it as I woke up so early and took care of everything. Next day sitting in the evening discussing things with mum. The same topic got raised and I told my mum about it. She smiled and said “Papa saw the stains last night”. I was shocked and got embarrassed at the same time. I started apologizing to mum for not taking care (As nobody’s supposed to know that it’s “that time of the month”). My mum stopped me in between and said why you apologizing it’s all natural. What made the major change were the words my father told my mother. He was not ashamed that he saw my stains, instead my father said “Beti badi ho rahi hai” (My daughter is getting older).

My father had tears in his eyes as being a father of three daughters; he was happy and sad at the same time. Happy, as their daughters were taking small steps towards womanliness and were sad, as we will not be their little kids anymore.

We were always taught to be free and open-minded in our approach. What made me more proud was the way my father responded to this. I never had to buy sanitary pads in black poly bags or in newspapers. I never have to hide my sanitary pads packet from my dad and brother. I was never told to stay out of the holy places even if it’s “that time of the month”. My parents are not very educated; however their approach towards life and giving us the power to shine is our strength.

A small gesture towards the most normal thing in this world by my parents changed lot of things for me and my prospective. Start embracing and stop being embarrassed about this. For all the fathers in the world, your daughters will be your little princesses forever, just embrace the new change in her life!

All the ladies out there, share your first “period experience” in the comment section below.

5 comments

  1. Well, that is a good thing and glad that you shared some of your insights about yourself on the subject of menstruation.

    I am a guy, but I was 16 or 17 when my mother told me about menstruation because I came to know about it from my school studies amd was curious to know. She isn’t very much educated either, but knew that some of the things can be cleared out and confusion can be averted if parents can teach their children these little but very significant things. I used to see my mother struggle with her menstruation like back pain, fever and other things. Me and my brother would help her out in her daily household chores as much as we could.

    But we do have things in our religion about visiting holy places and not to perform prayers. But it is fine with me, I don’t mind that, as long as you are comfortable with it. I guess different cultures, beliefs and religions have different customs and opinions about it. Like you mentioned, it’s a part of the body and that’s how we are made.

    1. Thank you so much for sharing your story. I feel great that we all are talking about it now and we need more and more people to come out and accept it the way it is. ☺️

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